All hard work and no biscuits

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I’d written a children’s book, attempted and failed to get an agent or traditional publisher, and had finally decided to go for the self-publishing option. What to do next?

I naively thought it might be a case of simply sending the manuscript off to my chosen publisher, Matador, and then sitting back with a cup of coffee and some biscuits, with the dog at my feet. I assumed that after we had relaxed for a while, a parcel would come in the post, full of beautifully produced books.

It seemed we still had much to learn. First of all, the publisher strongly advised that I have the manuscript copy-edited to check for mistakes, grammatical errors, etc. They could do this for me, or they could recommend a list of independent companies to do it; I selected Cornerstones, one of the independent ones, and sent my manuscript off. I soon had an email back to let me know that they’d have it back to me in about a month. In the mean-time, the publisher advised me that I would also need a front-cover illustration. I googled around until I came across an illustrator called Ian R. Ward, whose work I liked, and I got in touch with him. I sent him some excerpts from the book so he could get an idea of the characters, and he was soon working on some initial sketches.

I thought at this point that biscuit-time might have arrived, but the copy-edited manuscript came back sooner than I’d expected. Now I needed to sit down and go through it word by word, looking at each change that the copy-editor had suggested, and deciding whether I wanted to accept each one or not. I did that and sent it off to the publisher. Was it biscuit-time at last? With the dog’s tail wagging, we headed towards the tin.

But before we could get the lid off, an email arrived from the illustrator, to say that the cover illustration was finished. I explain to the dog that we need to hold off on the biscuits until I’d had a look at it. The illustration was great, and completely captured the feel of the book. Fantastic! Off to the publishers with that as well!

Surely now, the dog pleaded, we could put the kettle on and get the biscuits out? But wait – another email arrived from the publisher to say that I needed to look at a style proof, to see what I thought about the font, font size and general page layout they’d suggested for the main text.

Right, done that as well. The dog and I sat down, and even had the biscuits half way to our mouths before another email pinged into my in-box. The dog raised his eye-brows and gave me his best and most exasperated ‘Harrumph’. Whatever now? It was a suggested front-cover design from the publisher’s graphic designer, incorporating my illustrator’s cover illustration. What did I think about the lay-out, font, etc., for that?

The dog put his head down and wandered dejectedly off towards his bed. He could only assume that the biscuits would be stale before we got to them. Who would have thought that self-publishing was such hard work? I kept quiet, not wanting to lower his spirits further by telling him that it wasn’t over yet…

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2 thoughts on “All hard work and no biscuits

  1. I think it’s fabulous that you have this much direction and support! Yes–it’s still hard work, so much of it, yet you’ll end up with the best product you can. Good for you. (With apologies to the biscuit-less dog.)

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  2. Thanks Becky! It’s hard work though, isn’t it? You’ll know all about that, I’m sure, as you are a step further ahead of me in your publishing career! Do your own guinea pigs inspire your stories?

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